Kera Reed - Burner Law Group, P.C.



Kera Reed
Burner Law Group, P.C.
12 Research Way
East Setauket, NY 11733

631-941-3434

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Kera Reed
Burner Law Group, P.C.

Attorney Profile
Law School

Hofstra University
2007 - 2010

Website

https://burnerlaw.com/

631-941-3434


Kera Reed is an attorney at Burner Law Group, P.C. She joined the firm in January 2012 and now leads the firms Estate and Trust Administration Department overseeing all phases of Probate and Estate administration as well as estate litigation matters. Kera’s practice includes all Surrogate’s Court proceedings to appoint an Executor or Administrator of an estate, SCPA Article 17 and 17-A guardianship proceedings, preparation and litigation of fiduciary accountings, and preparation of New York State and Federal estate tax returns. She also is qualified to serve as Guardian ad Litem in Surrogates’ Court proceedings. In addition to her Trust and Estate practice, Kera is certified to serve as counsel and court evaluator in Supreme Court Guardianship matters. She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Trusts and Estates section’s Executive Committee and is also the Co-Chair of the Surrogates Court Committee of the Suffolk County Bar Association. Kera is also on the New York State Office of Court Administration E-Filing Advisory Committee which assists in implementing E-filing procedures statewide. Kera also writes a monthly column on Surrogate’s Court practice in the Suffolk Lawyer newspaper.

Kera received her undergraduate degree from St. John’s University in 2007 and graduated cum laude. She received her Juris Doctor from Hofstra University School of Law in 2010. While attending law school, Kera received the Linda Carmody-Roberts Scholarship for students who have demonstrated a commitment to pursuing careers in the Trust & Estates and Elder Law fields. At graduation, she received a Bronze Level Pro Bono Service Award for her work with the Nassau Suffolk Law Services Senior Citizens Law Project. After law school, Kera has continued her pro bono work by serving as court appointed guardian.

In 2018 she received the honor of being named an “Outstanding Woman in Law” by Hofstra University School of Law Center for Children Families and the Law and Long Island Business News.

In 2020, for the fourth consecutive year, Minneapolis-based Law & Politics publishers of Super Lawyers magazines announced that Kera had been named as a Rising Star Attorney. Super Lawyers published in the New York Times Magazine is a listing of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement in their respective fields. Each year, no more than 5 percent of the lawyers in the state receive this honor. In 2019, Kera was also honored with the Leadership in Law Award by the Long Island Business News, which is dedicated to those individuals whose leadership, both in the legal profession and in the community, has had a positive impact on Long Island. Recipients of this award demonstrate outstanding achievements, involvement in their profession, support of the community and mentoring.

Kera is licensed to practice law in New York State. She lives in Shoreham with her husband, daughter and son.


Kera Reed's Law Posts

A common issue that arises during the administration of an estate concerns assets that were transferred close to death. These transfers can be in the form of gifts or the creation of a joint tenancy or a beneficiary designation. Any Executor or Administrator of a decedent’s estate who is made aware of such transfers or changes must investigate whether it is worthwhile to seek recovery of these assets on behalf of the estate.

A common issue that arises during the administration of an estate concerns assets that were transferred close to death. These transfers can be in the form of gifts or the creation of a joint tenancy or a beneficiary designation. For example, a parent may have transferred cash in a bank…
burnerlaw.com

A family tree affidavit is an affidavit executed by a disinterested person to prove who a decedent’s distributees are. A family tree affidavit is required in New York in the Surrogate’s Court when filing petitions for probate and administration when the decedent was survived by only one distributee or where the relationship of the distributees to the decedent is grandparents, aunts, uncles, or first cousins. Visit our blog to learn how a family tree affidavit affects the probate proceeding.

A family tree affidavit is an affidavit executed by a disinterested person to prove who a decedent’s distributees are. To be considered disinterested, the person must have no financial interest in the decedent’s estate. A distributee is a legal heir that would inherit from an estate, by law, if the…
burnerlaw.com

It pays to tie the knot, at least according to the IRS. The unlimited marital deduction is a provision in the U.S. Estate and Gift Tax Law that allows individuals to transfer an unrestricted amount of assets to their spouse at any time, free from tax. The unlimited marital deduction is considered an estate preservation tool because assets can be distributed to surviving spouses without incurring any estate or gift tax liability. Head to our blog to learn more.

It pays to tie the knot, at least according to the IRS. The unlimited marital deduction is a provision in the U.S. Estate and Gift Tax Law that allows individuals to transfer an unrestricted amount of assets to their spouse at any time, free from tax. The unlimited marital deduction…
burnerlaw.com

Even if someone passes away with an estate below the federal estate tax exemption amount of $11.7 million dollars, if married, the estate should consider filing an estate tax return to capture the deceased spouse’s unused exemption amount.

Even if someone passes away with an estate below the federal estate tax exemption amount of $11.7 million dollars, if married, the estate should consider filing an estate tax return to capture the deceased spouse’s unused exemption amount. In 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act increased the federal estate…
burnerlaw.com

Under Article 19 of the New York Surrogate’s Court Procedure Act, real property vests in the decedent’s heirs or legatees immediately as owners date of death. So why would someone have to go through probate to take title or sell it?

Under Article 19 of the New York Surrogate's Court Procedure Act, real property vests in the decedent’s heirs or legatees immediately as owners date of death. So why would someone have to go through probate to take title or sell it? Although technically a probate or administration proceeding in the…
burnerlaw.com

It is important to be mindful of New York’s steep estate tax cliff and plan accordingly with an experienced estate planning attorney. Don’t fall off the cliff!

New York State has an estate tax “cliff”, which means that if an estate exceeds 105% of the New York estate tax exemption then the estate will receive absolutely no exemption from New York estate taxes and the entire value of the estate is subject to New York’s estate tax.…
burnerlaw.com

It is critical to do estate tax planning if you or your spouse have an estate that is potentially taxable under New York State law or taxable under the proposed changes to the federal estate tax laws. Most taxpayers will never pay a federal estate tax under the current Act. If the federal estate tax exemption is reduced to $3.5 million, many more estates would be subject to a federal estate tax, especially on Long Island.

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) increased the federal estate tax exclusion amount for decedents dying in years 2018 to 2025. The exclusion amount for 2021 is $11.7 million. This means that an individual can leave $11.7 million and a married couple can leave $23.4 million dollars…
burnerlaw.com

In order for a person to contest a last will and testament (“will”) in New York, he or she must have legal grounds. This means a reason based in the law that the will is invalid and should not be admitted to probate. Having grounds for contesting a will takes more than simply disliking the terms of the will or being unhappy with its distribution. Visit our blog to find out the most common grounds for challenging a will.

In order for a person to contest a last will and testament (“will”) in New York, he or she must have legal grounds. This means a reason based in the law that the will is invalid and should not be admitted to probate. Admitting a will to probate means that…
burnerlaw.com